The Weald of Kent, Surrey and Sussex
Crowborough Chapel [als All Saints Church]  Chapel Green    Crowborough  
Parish records Before
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After
2000

117Christenings1116
2Marriages2
2Burials11
 

Books and other documents
PublishedTitle, author and references
1766The History of Tunbridge Wells by Thomas Benge Burr ⇒ p. 262
1890An Illustrated Guide to Crowborough by Boys FirminBook extract p. 56
1928Rotherfield - The Story of some Wealden Manors by Catharine Pulleinp. 254
1933The Story of Crowbrough ⇒ p. 40
1985Crowborough - The Growth of a Wealden Town by Malcolm Payne ⇒ p. 95

Historical records

12th Jun 1734HistoryChurchSir Henry Fermor's Will
Extracts from Sir Henry Fermor's will dated 21 January 1732 and proven on 12th June 1734
I will and appoint William Oakill of Sevenoaks, aforesaid, Schoolmaster of the Charity School I have directed to be built in the Parish of Rotherfield
...............
I will and direct that my trustees shall lay out any sum, not exceeding the sum of £1,500 in erecting and building a chapel, or church, and a Charity School, in the plainest and cheapest manner, so as it be strong and lasting, for the ease and benefit of the parishes and parishioners of Rotherfield and Buxted, in the said County of Sussex, which Church and Charity School I will shall be erected and built in or near a place called Crowborough and Ashdown Forest, as my executors shall think most convenient, for the use and benefit of the very ignorant and heathenish people
A further £4,500 was given for purchase of land to be held in trust so that the rents and profits earned could go towards the maintenance of a shoolmaster and minister .......
A sum of £3,000 was to be invested in land for the benefit of the poor children to be taught and educated in the said school, from time to time, as long as they continue scholars there; the yearly rents, issues, and profits of the same land to be laid out in buying wool, hemp and books, to be equally divided and distributed amongst them ...
...................
Sir Henry stipulated that no child should be less than 7 years of age upon admittance, nor proceed in education above the space of four years". The children were to be taught to read, write and cast accounts, and at no time were there to be more than 40 children in attendance.
Sir Henry Fermor died in Sevenoaks on 2 June 1734
The Charity School and Chapel were completed in 1744

1744Crowborough Chapel and SchoolCrowborough Chapel and School, Crowborough by Samuel Grimm and James Lambert (The Burrell Collection)Crowborough Chapel [als All Saints Church]The Burrell Collection
Samuel Hieronymous Grimm (1733-1794), artist, was born in Switzerland, studied in Berne and Paris before moving to Covent Garden, London in 1768. Besides his work as a commercial engraver and watercolour painter he is best known for some 2,500 commissioned watercolurs of antiquities, historic buildings and landscapes in the British Library (MSS 15537-48). Throughout the 1780s he toured Sussex, sketching churches, monuments, castles, abbeys and houses of the gentry
James Lambert, senior, (1725-1788) and his nephew James Lambert, junior, (1744-1799) were both landscape painters living in Lewes, Sussex. Between them they produced over 600 items, ranging from pencil sketches to large oils.
William Burrell (1732-96), antiquary, was born in Leadenhall Street, London, educated at Westminster School and Cambridge University. He became Chancellor of Worcester and Rochester Dioceses, M.P. for Haslemere and a Commissioner of Excise. From 1780 he employed Samuel Grimm and the Lamberts to make drawings of all the notable antiquities and important houses in Sussex, which he bequeathed to the British Museum in his will.
for more information refer to Sussex Views by Walter H. Godfrey and L.F. Salzman and Sussex Depicted by John Farrant, both published by the Sussex Record Society.

c 1825Crowborough, Sussex - c 1825Part of the 1 inch to 1 mile map of Sussex produced in 1825 by Christopher and John GreenwoodChapel

1834HistorychapelHorsfield's Sussex
Crowborough is worthy of notice. It is remarkable for its great height, being the fourth highest hill in the county, and 804 feet above the level of the sea; on the summit stood formerly a beacon; in the bottom, at the south-east side, stands two neat edifices, exhibiting the appearance of a hermitage. They are a chapel and a school house funded by Sir Henry Fermor, Bart., late of Sevenoaks, Kent, whose family were originally of this parish.

30th Mar 1851CensusHead; occupation Chaplain of CrowboroughReverend John Jervis William Turner, M.A.Crowborough Chapel1851 Census
Rotherfield, Sussex
30th Mar 1851CensusWifeAnn Turner
30th Mar 1851CensusVisitor; occupation: ward of chanceryMargaret Mignelle
30th Mar 1851CensusServant; occupation: general servantHannah Mackellow [Tasker]
30th Mar 1851CensusServant; occupation: general servantRhoda Latter [Duplock]

1867Directory entryTurner Rev. Jno. Jervis Wm., Crowboro'Crowboro'Post Office Directory
At CROWBOROUGH is a chapel and a school for boys, both endowed in 1732 by Sir Henry Fermor ; the Rev. John Jervis William Turner, chaplain.

c 1875Crowborough Chapel Green, Sussex - c 1875Part of the 6 inch to 1 mile map of Sussex produced in 1875 by Ordnance SurveyCrowborough Chapel

17th Sep 1880HistoryAll Saints' ChurchFermor School 1744-1994

Under the terms of the original Scheme, the Governors of the Sir Henry Fermor's Foundation were to take charge of the old Fermor Trust until, following negotiations with the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, a final severence and settlement of the endowment fund was completed. This aspect, the formal separation of the church or chapel from the school, came about on 17 September 1880 - the founding date of All Saints' Church.

Although 23 October 1877 was the date the school could operate as an independent body from the Trust, it was not the date the new school appeared on the Charity Farm site. Construction began in 1878, and completion came near the end of 1880, possibly coinciding with 17 September, the date the old schoolhouse became the property of the Church. Up until that time, the schoolhouse had been in use under the mastership of Mr Jeremiah Davis, who then became the first headmaster of the new Sir Henry Fermor School.


1882Directory entryCrowborough Chapel [als All Saints Church]Kelly's Directory
The church of All Saints is being re-built.

1890All Saints ChurchAll Saints Church, CrowboroughFirmin's Guide

c 1890Choir of All Saints Church in the 1890sChoir of All Saints Church in the 1890s, CrowboroughFermor School 1744-1994

c 1899Crowborough Chapel Green, Sussex - c 1899Part of the 6 inch to 1 mile map of Sussex produced in 1899 by Ordnance SurveyAll Saints Church

1900All Saints ChurchAll Saints Church, Crowborough photographed by Francis Frith
The Francis Frith Web Site The Frith archive was founded by Francis Frith, the pioneer Victorian photographer, in 1860 and today contains over 365,000 photographs of some 7,000 towns and villages throughout Britain. Taken between 1860 and 1970 these form a topographical record of Britain without equal and is recognised as probably the only photographic collection of national importance in private hands in Britain today.

The importance of the Frith archive is as a topographical and social record. It provides an amazingly detailed visual record of over 7,000 towns and villages, as well as illustrating the enormous social and structural changes which have taken place in Britain since 1860. Whilst some of the photographs are undoubtedly artistically outstanding, the real value of the archive lies in its scale. There is no other archive which can illustrate this period of British history so extensively or to such a high quality.

1900All Saints Church and VicarageAll Saints Church and Vicarage, Crowborough photographed by Francis Frith
The Francis Frith Web Site The Frith archive was founded by Francis Frith, the pioneer Victorian photographer, in 1860 and today contains over 365,000 photographs of some 7,000 towns and villages throughout Britain. Taken between 1860 and 1970 these form a topographical record of Britain without equal and is recognised as probably the only photographic collection of national importance in private hands in Britain today.

The importance of the Frith archive is as a topographical and social record. It provides an amazingly detailed visual record of over 7,000 towns and villages, as well as illustrating the enormous social and structural changes which have taken place in Britain since 1860. Whilst some of the photographs are undoubtedly artistically outstanding, the real value of the archive lies in its scale. There is no other archive which can illustrate this period of British history so extensively or to such a high quality.

1910All Saints ChurchAll Saints Church, Crowborough photographed by A.H. Homewood, Burgess HillPrivate collection

c 1910All Saints ChurchAll Saints Church, CrowboroughPrivate collection

1911All Saints ChurchAll Saints Church, Crowborough photographed by Valentine's seriesBill Chewter's records

c 1920Crowborough Green and All Saints ChurchCrowborough Green and All Saints Church, CrowboroughCrowborough Chapel [als All Saints Church]Private collection

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