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Historical notes about Fletching
1597 to 1598HistoryFletchingBuckhurst Terrier
Sir John Sackville, who was sheriff of Surrey and Sussex in the reign of Henry VIII, married Margaret Boleyn, the aunt of Queen Anne Boleyn, so that his son Richard was that queen’s first cousin. This Richard Sackville was a man of outstanding ability.......He grew very rich by dealings in land in many counties, often the former possessions of suppressed chantrys and of attainted noblemen, his name appears more frequently in the Close Rolls of that period than that of any other person ............ It was jestingly said of him that his name should be Fillsack, not Sackville. He acquired the lands of the Chantry of St. Marie in 1550, those of the Fraternity of St. Katherine probably at about the same time, Tablehurst in 1559, Imberhorne in 1560, and Alchorne in 1564............... The manor of Broome, which included the greater part of the village of Hartfield, was purchased some time after 1584. Collinghurst was also in his possession at the time of his death, April 21, 1564. His only son Thomas, born in 1536, was one of the most prominent men of his time. In his earlier years a poet, he was a favourite of Elizabeth I, his second cousin.... On the 8th of June, 1567, he was knighted, and on the same day created a baron under the title of Lord Buckhurst. Alter many services to the State he was made Lord High Treasurer in May, 1599. .......Soon after succeeding to the estates at the death of his father he set about the acquisition by purchase and exchange of further manors in the vicinity of Buckhurst......The manor of Withyham, called Mounkencourts or Munkloe 1569-70; the manors of Sheffield and Tarring Peverell 1570; Ridgehill 1576; Bolebrook 1590; Lavertie 1591; Framfield in 1592; Blackham 1592; Birchden, 1595; and Bullockstown in 1585.....Sir Thomas Sackville, Lord Buckhurst, had thus in 1597 in his possession seventeen manors in north-east Sussex, including the manor of Buckhurst, as well as several others in the southern part of the rape. In view of the many recent acquisitions, and the number of leases that had been granted since 1592, it was expedient to record the seventeen in a Terrier in 1597-8
1610[North] Sussex[North] Sussex by John Norden and augmented by John SpeedFletchingJohn Speed
The first engraved maps of the counties of Great Britain were the work of Christopher Saxton who, under the authority of the Privy Council, surveyed the English counties in Elizabethan times, from 1574 to 1578. In 1593 he was followed by John Norden who projected an ambitious scheme for a complete series of county histories. He published before his death a number of counties - Middlesex, Hertfordshire, Essex, Northampton, Cornwall, Sussex and Surrey. John Speed's map of Sussex is based upon Norden's map and was engraved by Jodocus Hondius. It occupies pages nine and ten of John Speed's Atlas entitled "The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine", is 20 1/4 inches by 15 1/4 inches in size and shows additionally an interesting plan of Chichester and a spirited representation of the Battle of Hastings.
1645[North] Sussex[North] Sussex by Jan BlaeuFletchingJan Blaeu
1695[North] Sussex[North] Sussex by Robert MordenFletchingRobert Morden
Robert Morden was a London bookseller from 1669 until his death in 1703. He specialised in the geographical field and was himself something of a cartographer and a publisher. Throughout the 17th and most of the 18th centuries, there was little distinction between the activity of book or print-selling and that of publishing: many booksellers were also printers or engravers. They undertook the sale of each others' work and often combined to meet the high cost of publishing a new map or reissue of an old atlas, even if the original plates were still available. This map was published in Brittania: a chorographical description of Great Britain and Ireland by William Camden.
c 1724Fletching and Maresfield, Sussex - c 1724Part of the 1 inch to 1 mile map of Sussex produced in 1724 by Richard BudgenFletching
1763A New Map of [North] SussexA New Map of [North] Sussex by Thomas KitchinFletchingThomas Kitchin
Thomas Kitchin, an engraver and publisher from c.1738 to 1776, held the appointment of Hydrographer to the King. His output was prolific. He engraved the maps of the British and French dominions in North America by John Mitchell (1755), which was used at the peace coucil at the end of the revolutionary war. In his later years he worked with his son (hence senior after his name in the c.1755 edition of the Small English Atlas). He died in 1784.
1st Sep 1787[North] Sussex[North] Sussex by John CaryFletchingJohn Cary
John Cary, apprenticed to William Palmer in 1770, went into business in 1783 as a publisher of maps, plans and road-books. He was highly successful and is referred to as the founder of the modern English School of Cartography by H.G. Fordham
c 1795Fletching and Marefield, Sussex - c 1795Part of the 1 inch to 1 mile map of Sussex produced in 1795 by William Gardner and Thomas GreamFletching
1808[North] Sussex[North] Sussex by G.Cole and engraved by J.RoperFletchingG. Cole
The British atlas; comprising a series of county maps…intended to illustrate and accompany 'The beauties of England and Wales' published 1808.
c 1825Fletching and Marefield, Sussex - c 1825Part of the 1 inch to 1 mile map of Sussex produced in 1825 by Christopher and John GreenwoodFletching
1828 to 1829Pigot's Directory for Uckfield, Fletching, Buxted, Maresfield and Nutley - 1828 to 1829Pigot's 1828/1829 Directory for Uckfield, Fletching, Buxted, Maresfield and NutleyPigot's Directory
1832 to 1834Pigot's Directory for Uckfield, Fletching, Buxted, Maresfield and Nutley - 1832 to 1834Pigot's 1832/33/34 Directory for Uckfield, Fletching, Buxted, Maresfield and NutleyPigot's Directory
1839 to 1840Pigot's Directory for Uckfield, Fletching, Buxted, Maresfield and Nutley - 1839 to 1840Pigot's 1839/40 Directory for Uckfield, Fletching, Buxted, Maresfield and NutleyPigot's Directory
1840[North] Sussex[North] Sussex by Joshua Archer, Pentonville, LondonFletchingDugdale
Dugdale's England and Wales Delineated
6th Jun 1841CensusFletching1841 Census
Fletching, Sussex
All that part of the Parish of Fletching which lies on the North side of the road and footpath from Dane Hill by Pepper Alley to the Folly and on the West side of the road from thence to the Aggens on the North side of the Aggens Lane to the boundary of the Parish between the Beacon and Chelwood House (Mr Streeters' House excepted it being more convenient to take it in District No 3) from thence this district is bounded by the Parishes of Maresfield, West Hoathly and Horsted Keynes to Dane Hill.
Enumerator: Stephen Ridge
6th Jun 1841CensusFletching1841 Census
Fletching, Sussex
All that part of the Parish of Fletching from Short Bridge to Fords Green bounded on the Eastern side by the Parish of Maresfield and on the Western side by the Rushton Brook.
Enumerator: George Stevenson
6th Jun 1841CensusFletching1841 Census
Fletching, Sussex
All that part of the Parish of Fletching on the South side of the River Ouse and also that part on the North side of the same River which lies on the South side of the Sheffield Green road from Eastbridge to Splains Green from there on the South side of the Fletching Lane to the Rushton Brook, which Brook empties itself into the River Ouse and will form a well defined Eastern boundary, the Western boundary from Eastbridge is also well defined by a stream from there to the Ouse.
This district will comprise the Village of Fletching.
Enumerator: Joseph Payn
6th Jun 1841CensusFletching1841 Census
Fletching, Sussex
All that part of the Parish of Fletching on the North side of Fletching Lane and Sheffield Green road on the East side of the Turnpike road to the Paygate at the extremity of the Green and on the same side of a road from thence to the Aggens Lane at Chelwood Common on the South side of the Aggens Lane through a plantation to the Southeastern side of Chelwood including Streeters house on the North side of the lane to the boundary of the Parish between Chelwood House and the Beacon, thence on the Western side of the boundary of the Parish to the Rushton Brook and on the Western side of the Brook to Daleham.
Enumerator: Thomas Ashby
6th Jun 1841CensusFletching1841 Census
Fletching, Sussex
All that part of the Parish of Fletching from Sheffield Bridge which lies on the West side of the road to the Folly at Chelwood Common and on the South side of the footpath from there to Pepper Alley and of a road to Dane Hill from thence by the same boundary to Sheffield Bridge. That part also of Sheffield Park which lies to the West of the stream which forms the Western boundary of District No. 2 from East bridges to the Ouse is included in this district.
Enumerator: James Fuller
30th Mar 1851CensusFletching1851 Census
Fletching, Sussex
All that part of Fletching from Short Bridge to Foords Green bounded on the Eastern side by the Parish of Maresfield and on the West by the Rushton Brook.
Enumerator - George Stevenson
30th Mar 1851CensusFletching1851 Census
Fletching, Sussex
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30th Mar 1851CensusFletching1851 Census
Fletching, Sussex
All that part of the Parish of Fletching on the Northern side of the road from the Rushton Brook to the Sheffield Arms, from thence on the Eastern side of the Turnpike road from Lewes to London to the Toll Bar and taking all houses on the Eastern side of the lane leading to the Folly from thence following the road to Chelwood Common and from thence to Chelwood House.
Enumerator - Thomas Ashby
30th Mar 1851CensusFletching1851 Census
Fletching, Sussex
All that part of the Parish of Fletching from Sheffield Bridge including the Sheffield Park bounded on the East by the Turnpike road from Lewes to London and taking all the houses on the North Western side of this Turnpike road to the Folly, from thence to Pepper Alley and Danehill and to the extremity of the parish on the Northwest.
Enumerator - James Weston Fuller
30th Mar 1851CensusFletching1851 Census
Fletching, Sussex
All that part of the Parish of Fletching called Chelwood Common commencing at the Tollgate Danehill to the extremity of the parish to the North and continuing on to Chelwood Gate, Isle of Thorns and Cottages and from thence to the boundary of 1c and 1d districts.
Enumerator - James Batchellor
1864East Sussex with the addition of the RailwaysEast Sussex with the addition of the Railways by Mark Antony LowerFletchingLower's Sussex
Mark Antony Lower, son of Richard Lower, born 14th July 1813 in Heathfield, school master in the early 1830s at East Hoathly, Heathfield and Alfriston; and at Lewes from 1835 to 1867; and at Seaford 1867-1871. He then moved to London where he died in 1876.
He was a founder member of the Sussex Archeological Society and a prolific contributor to the collections of the society.
He published
1867DirectoryFletchingPost Office Directory
FLETCHING is a parish, 4 miles north-west from Uckfield railway station, 10 east from Cuckfield, and 40 from London in the Eastern division of the county, Rushmonden hundred, Uckfield union, Pevensey rape, Lewes county court district and archdeaconry, and diocese of Chichester.
................
The parish comprises 8,463 acres, a great portion of which is wood and common land; the population in 1861 was 2,028.
...............
1874DirectoryFletchingPost Office Directory
FLETCHING is a parish, 4 miles north-west from Uckfield railway station, 10 east from Cuckfield, and 40 from London, in tic Eastern division of the county, Rushmonden Hundred, Uckfield union, Pevensey rape, Lewes county court district, rural deanery of Pevensey No. 3, archdeaconry of Lewes, and diocese of Chichester.
................
The parish comprises 8,463 acres, a great portion of which is wood and common land; gross estimated rental, £8,392; rateable value, £7,503; and the population in 1871 was 2,155.
.................
c 1875Fletching Common, Sussex - c 1875Part of the 6 inch to 1 mile map of Sussex produced in 1875 by Ordnance SurveyFletching
3rd Apr 1881CensusFletching1881 Census
Fletching, Sussex
East of Fletching including Short Bridge, Funnell Farm, Searles, Splanes Green and Piltdown Commmon
3rd Apr 1881CensusFletching1881 Census
Fletching, Sussex
Fletching Village including the Griffin Inn and South of Fletching including Parsonage Farm, Fletching Common and Grislings Common
3rd Apr 1881CensusFletching1881 Census
Fletching, Sussex
West of Fletching including Sheffield Park, Sheffield Green, Ketches Farm, Splaynes Green and Atheralls Farm
3rd Apr 1881CensusFletching1881 Census
Fletching, Sussex
North West of Fletching including Sliders Farm, Danehurst, Danehill, Chelwood Gate, Isle of Thorns and Chelwood Common
3rd Apr 1881CensusFletching1881 Census
Fletching, Sussex
North East of Fletching including Danehill and Chelwood Common
1882DirectoryFletchingKelly's Directory
FLETCHING is a parish 4 miles north-west from Uckfield, 10 1/2 north-east from Lewes and 40 from London, in the Eastern division of the county, Rushmonden hundred, Uckfield union, Pevensey rape, Lewes county court district, rural deanery of Pevensey, No. 3, archdeaconry of Lewes and diocese of Chichester. A station, called Sheffield Bridges, will shortly (1882) be opened on the branch line from East Grinstead to Lewes, in connection with the London, Brighton and South Coast railway, a portion of the line extending from East Grinstead to the main line.
..............
The area is 8,463 acres, a great portion of which is wood and common land; rateable value, £8,917; and the population in 1881 was 2,213.
...............
1888Brooker's Guide and Directory - 1888Brooker's 1888 Guide and Directory of FletchingBrooker's Guide
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